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Soldiers with deep wounds sometimes feel no pain at all for hours, while people without any detectable injury live in chronic physical anguish. How to explain that?

Over drinks in a Boston-area bar, Ronald Melzack, a psychologist, and Dr. Patrick Wall, a physiologist, sketched out a diagram on a cocktail napkin that might help explain this and other puzzles of pain perception. The result, once their idea was fully formed, was an electrifying theory that would become the founding document for the field of modern pain studies and establish the career of Dr. Melzack, whose subsequent work deepened medicine’s understanding of pain and how it is best measured and treated. Dr. Melzack died on Dec. 22 in a hospital near his home in Montreal, where he lived, his daughter, Lauren Melzack, said. He was 90, and had spent most of his professional life as a professor of psychology at McGill University.

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If you a CPP, briefly skimming over this report it’s likely to anger some, but a more thorough read of the content should in fact encourage most, assuming of course the data is used within the context of, treating chronic pain with opioids is not the same as opioid misuse. The data will in fact help uncover drug abuse by those who attempt to exploit our healthcare system as yet another drug source in their efforts to continue their drug abuse efforts.

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Chronic pain being discussed on Dr. Drew with Don't Punish Pain Founder Claudia Merandi Follow this link

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By R Carter

This update on trends reflects changes on how chronic pain has been viewed and managed as America’s struggle with opioids continues. It’s often insightful to look back at how our government viewed chronic pain and compare that to how they have responded. This report from the CDC published thirteen years ago in 2006 stands in stark contrast to the 2016 CDC Guidelines for Chronic Pain Management, at a time when anti-opioid zealots had clearly gotten the upper hand. More importantly is how our healthcare system has responded, indicating what appears to be an effort to cherry pick the data which fits an ideological point of view. 

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Locating a pain management doctor has become a daunting task. Click here to find one in your area.

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Rally founder, Claudia A. Merandi, discusses the difficulties the pain community is enduring accessing pain management.
Click this link to view the Dr. Drew Podcast


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By R Carter


If we adopt the vector model of disease when addressing addiction for any valuable medicinal, whether it’s opioids, benzodiazepines or any other controlled medicine,  what’s at stake is our ability to ease and cure human suffering, not prevent addiction.

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By R Carter

Minnesota introduced a bill to require healthcare providers to use a HIPAA Universal Consent form with the idea of protecting the healthcare privacy of it’s citizens. 

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nytimes.com

In a newly published guide, federal health officials say doctors “should never abandon” pain patients and warn of acute withdrawal and other risks.

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abcnews.go.com

U.S. health officials are again warning doctors against abandoning chronic pain patients by abruptly stopping their opioid prescriptions.

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Reporthhs.gov

The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (CARA) required the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force to develop the Report on Pain Management Best Practices: Updates, Gaps, Inconsistencies, and Recommendations - PDF*, which identified gaps or inconsistencies, and proposed updates to best practices and recommendations for pain management, including chronic and acute pain.

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