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  • America in Pain; Why No One Cares. Claudia Merandi and Beth Dost, RN

    Caught up in a war against illicit Fentanyl and Heroin, 50 million Americans who suffer from chronic, daily pain have been marginalized and discarded.  

  • DEA Warns of Counterfeit Pill "Surge" Following its Crackdown on Prescriptions

    Truth Out published an article on October, 1, 2021 regarding the DEA's recent public safety alert about the abundance of counterfeit prescription pills. Mike Ludwig's article is part of the series "The Policing of Pain: Inside the Deadly War on Opioids." This increase demand for prescription pills is largely due to a crackdown on prescribing of controlled substances. Mike explains that the link between "overprescribing" and the overdose crisisis greatly exaggerated, citing the fact that opioid prescribing has plummeted to the lowest it has been in a decade as overdoses have skyrocketed. Claudia Merandi, Founder and President of The Doctor Patient Forum, was interviewed for this article.

  • How Can Doctors Stay Protected?

    Doctors need to have a compliance plan in place in order to stay protected when prescribing scheduled drugs. Please contact Chapman Consulting Groupwith any questions.

    "If you don't follow up on red flags you're being labeled as a criminal prescriber" ~Compliance Officer

    "The government has chosen to target doctors instead of the cartels, who are brining in the drugs that are killing people." ~Compliance Officer

  • Supreme Court Case on March 1, 2022 Can Make All the Difference For Doctors and Patients

    On March 1, 2022, the Supreme Court will hear a case that could make or break the future for pain doctors and their patients. Pat Anson, from Pain News Network, summed it up perfectly in this article "Supreme Court Case May Decide Future of Opioid Prescribing."


    By Pat Anson, PNN Editor

    December 29, 2021

    "Over a dozen patient and physician advocacy groups have filed legal briefs with the U.S. Supreme Court in support of two doctors appealing their convictions for criminal violations of the Controlled Substances Act.

    The nation’s high court has consolidated the cases of Dr. Xiulu Ruan of Alabama and Dr. Shakeel Kahn, who practiced in Wyoming and Arizona. Both doctors were sentenced to lengthy prison terms after being convicted on a variety of charges – including the prescribing of high doses of opioid pain medication to patients “outside the usual course of professional practice.”

    Oral arguments will be heard by the Supreme Court on March 1, with a decision expected later in 2022. Monday was the deadline for interested parties to file “amicus curiae” briefs on the case, which could have a significant impact on opioid prescribing practices nationwide if the appeals are successful. Many doctors have stopped or reduced their prescribing of opioids because they fear being prosecuted under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

    “It is no exaggeration to say that CSA prosecutions of physicians have already impaired the treatment of chronic pain,” Ruan’s attorneys said in their appeal. “In response to the opioid crisis, fear of prosecution has increasingly prompted pain management doctors to avoid or reduce opioid prescriptions, even when those decisions leave chronic pain patients without recourse.”

    A successful appeal would mean Ruan and Kahn could ask for new trials, along with dozens of other doctors convicted of similar charges under the CSA.

    “It will also avoid what I see as the chilling effect that it’s had on lots of doctors who are not doing anything even remotely suspicious, but are afraid that they are going to get caught because they prescribe a higher dose, and so they’re dropping people from care or tapering them,” said Kate Nicholson.

    NPAC, along with other advocacy groups and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, are asking the high court to clearly state how the practice of medicine should be regulated under the CSA. Some argued it is best left to state medical boards, not federal prosecutors or law enforcement.

    “Patients with pain, addiction, or both desperately need appropriate care and treatment. If practitioners are held strictly liable under (the CSA), patient abandonment will become ever more common as practitioners act to avoid scrutiny,” Jennifer Oliva and Kelly Dineen, professors of health law and policy, said in their brief. “Progress in medical care in these areas can only recover if the regulation of medical practice is returned to the province of the states except in narrow circumstances.”

  • You Can't Treat My Pain Because You'll Lose Your License

    Watch Claudia interview pain patient, Connie. Connie has survived breast cancer twice, 30 surgeries, and MS, yet she's had a hard time finding a doctor to treat her pain.

    "The few doctors that are brave enough (to prescribe), it's only a matter of time before they get shut down." ~Connie

    "We're seeing people in hospice, palliative care, with acute injuries, kidney stones, and nobody is being treated because of the opioid elimination industry. This is a big business; there is a lot of money in suffering." ~Claudia Merandi

The Doctor Patient Forum

Claudia A. Merandi 5 Chedell Avenue / East Providence, RI 02914 / USA 1.401.523.0426

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